Five-Year Trend Analysis of Malaria Prevalence in Dembecha Health Center, West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia: A Retrospective Study

Joint Authors

Ferede, Aster
Million, Yihenew
Haile, Dessalegn
Kassie, Bekalu
Abebaw, Abtie

Source

Journal of Parasitology Research

Issue

Vol. 2020, Issue 2020 (31 Dec. 2020), pp.1-7, 7 p.

Publisher

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

Publication Date

2020-11-16

Country of Publication

Egypt

No. of Pages

7

Main Subjects

Zoology
Diseases

Abstract EN

Background.

Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease known to cause significant numbers of morbidities and mortalities across the globe.

In Ethiopia, its transmission is generally seasonal and highly unstable due to variations in topography and rainfall patterns.

Studying the trends in malaria in different setups is crucial for area-specific evidence-based interventions, informed decisions, and to track the effectiveness of malaria control programs.

The trend in malaria infections in the area has not been documented.

Hence, this study aimed to assess the five-year trend in microscopically confirmed malaria cases in Dembecha Health Center, West Gojjam Zone, Amhara national regional state, Ethiopia.

Methods.

A health facility-based retrospective study was conducted in Dembecha Health Center from February to April 2018.

All microscopically confirmed malaria cases registered between 2011/12 and 2015/16 were carefully reviewed from laboratory record books and analyzed accordingly.

Results.

A total of 12,766 blood films were requested over the last five years at Dembecha Health Center.

The number of microscopically confirmed malaria cases was 2086 (16.34%).

The result showed a fluctuating yet declining trend in malaria infections.

The highest number of cases was registered in 2012/13, while the lowest was in 2015/16.

Males and age groups >20 constituted 58.9% and 44.2% of the patients, respectively, being the hardest hit by malaria in the area.

Malaria existed in almost every month and seasons.

Plasmodium falciparum was the predominant species.

The highest peak of malaria infections was observed in the late transition (October-December) 799 (38.3%) and early transition (May-June) 589 (28.2%) seasons.

Conclusion.

Although the results indicate a fluctuating yet declining trend, the prevalence of confirmed malaria cases in the area remains alarming and indicates a major public health burden.

Therefore, close monitoring and intervention measures to control malaria infections in the area and also to tackle the dominant species, Plasmodium falciparum, are necessitated accordingly.

American Psychological Association (APA)

Haile, Dessalegn& Ferede, Aster& Kassie, Bekalu& Abebaw, Abtie& Million, Yihenew. 2020. Five-Year Trend Analysis of Malaria Prevalence in Dembecha Health Center, West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia: A Retrospective Study. Journal of Parasitology Research،Vol. 2020, no. 2020, pp.1-7.
https://search.emarefa.net/detail/BIM-1190118

Modern Language Association (MLA)

Ferede, Aster…[et al.]. Five-Year Trend Analysis of Malaria Prevalence in Dembecha Health Center, West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia: A Retrospective Study. Journal of Parasitology Research No. 2020 (2020), pp.1-7.
https://search.emarefa.net/detail/BIM-1190118

American Medical Association (AMA)

Haile, Dessalegn& Ferede, Aster& Kassie, Bekalu& Abebaw, Abtie& Million, Yihenew. Five-Year Trend Analysis of Malaria Prevalence in Dembecha Health Center, West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia: A Retrospective Study. Journal of Parasitology Research. 2020. Vol. 2020, no. 2020, pp.1-7.
https://search.emarefa.net/detail/BIM-1190118

Data Type

Journal Articles

Language

English

Notes

Includes bibliographical references

Record ID

BIM-1190118